Anti-Inflammatory/Anti-Aging Strategies
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During a recent 5-day cancer conference in Washington, D.C. additional evidence was presented about the fact that inflammation produced by fat cells (adipose tissue) contributes to the growth and spread of tumors.

Dr. M.Kolonin of the University of Texas Health Science Center in Texas has been quoted as saying: “Obesity is the leading preventable cause of cancer in the U.S. Extra body fat not only increases one’s risk of developing cancer, it is also associated with poorer prognosis [outcomes]”… “Ten percent to fifteen percent of cancer deaths may be attributed to obesity”.

Exactly how body fat influences cancer development is still under investigation, but the key appears to be the inflammatory responses of the body to cancer cells and vice versa. Macrophages are one of the major classes of white blood cells responsible for starting the inflammatory response when the body is threatened by cancer cells, and  reducing inflammation when the challenge is over.

Typically, the breast tissue of overweight and obese young women is more inflamed, and has more immune cells, such as macrophages compared to women of healthy weight.  Also cancer in obese women is more difficult to treat than in women at healthier weight.

Metabolic syndrome is associated with a group of factors that puts one at greater risk of having heart disease,diabetes and stroke. If a person has three of the following factors, or are on medication for them, it is called having a metabolic syndrome.  These factors are: excess stomach fat, high blood pressure and triglycerides. low levels of “good” cholesterol (HDL), and high blood sugar.

Image Fat cancer inflammation

In one study of 100 women, half of the women with inflammation of their breasts and early-stage breast cancer also had metabolic syndrome. 

Since obesity contributes to growth of tumors, investigators wondered whether weight loss might reverse the tendency to grow tumors.  In mice, tumors grew more slowly in obese mice that had previously lost weight.   

The body tightly regulates its inflammatory responses by balancing the amount of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immune factors it produces. Fat cells naturally produce inflammatory molecules.  High amounts of body fat encourages growth of cancer cells.`

Note:

Controlling one’s weight at healthy levels, being physically active for 2.5 hours/week, getting outside every day for a few minutes and using a superior immune-balancing supplement will go a long ways toward helping the body stay in immune balance, stay in immune homeostasis,

Dr.Hellen is available to help you enhance your quality of life to its maximum.  She can be contacted by using this form, contacting her at: drhellen@drhellengreenblatt.info or feel free to call her at:  302.265.3870 (ET, USA).

 

https://meyercancer.weill.cornell.edu/how_obesity_fuels_cancer
www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/49051/title/Fat-s-Influence-on-Cancer/
www.springer.com/us/book/9781461468189
clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2016/02/14/1078-0432.CCR-15-2239
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/ms
journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fonc.2014.00175/full
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27617172
  

Our heart is “simply” a large muscle that continuously pumps oxygen-rich blood throughout the body supplying cells, tissues and organs with life-giving oxygen and nutrients. The cells of the body release carbon dioxide and other gases as a by-product of producing energy. These gases are removed from the blood as it circulates through the lungs.

A heart attack results when blood is blocked from getting into the arteries that feed the heart. If not treated rapidly, parts of the heart muscle may die from lack of oxygen. After a heart attack, danger signals released by dying cells trigger inflammation which in turn attracts immune cells into the area to clear dead cells and tissue debris.

The high numbers of inflammatory immune cells stick to the plaque, increasing the risk for another heart attack. The body tries to heal itself by transforming the damaged heart muscle cells into scar tissue. Because scar tissue is hard and not flexible, a badly scarred heart cannot pump blood efficiently.

For any sort of healing, the body has to produce the right amount of inflammation. There has to be sufficient inflammation for the healing process, but not so much that excessive scarring occurs. Depending on how much scar tissue forms, congestive  heart failure may result due to the inability of the heart to pump normally.

Our cells produce cholesterol which is essential for a wide range of biological functions. The body has to manufacture the right amount of cholesterol and which has to go to specific parts of the body.   If too much cholesterol is produced over many years, cholesterol plaque builds up in the arteries resulting in atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is triggered by lifestyle issues that cause uncontrolled inflammation such as high blood pressure, smoking, poor dietary choices and excessive weight.

Plaque deposits narrow the passageways of arteries and block the flow of blood in vessels that feed the heart itself. The plaque may eventually harden, burst and release blood platelets that form clots in an attempt to stop the bleeding. The blood clots may cause even more blockages in the arteries, obstructing blood and oxygen flow and causing more heart damage. An artery to the heart which is blocked may result in a heart attack; a blocked artery in or leading to the brain results in a stroke.

 What is a Heart Attack?

 

In Summary:

1) Acting fast at the first sign of heart attack symptoms can save lives and limit damage to the heart. Heart attack treatment works best when it’s given right after symptoms occur. If you think you, or someone else is having a heart attack, even if you’re not sure, call emergency services immediately.

2) Current therapies for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease do not target inflammatory cells. Maintaining the body in immune homeostasis, immune balance, may help the body support healthy heart and cardiovascular function.

www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/heartattack
www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Inflammation-and-Heart-Disease_UCM_432150_Article.jsp#.V7un7mf6vcs
www.pnas.org/content/113/29/8212
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27619160
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375712
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27515051
stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/342/342ra80www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27542099

 

 

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