Anti-Inflammatory/Anti-Aging Strategies
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Aging typically does not occur overnight. Instead, it progresses gradually until you start feeling that you are indeed “aging”. You begin to realize that you cannot work or party as hard as you once did. You don not recover from workouts as quickly and you hurt the day after a hard work out. You are stiff in the morning or after a long drive. Your skin is not as tight as it once was, and winkles appear. You experience less energy, and your sexual drive suffers as well.

I am personally affronted when people share their complaints with doctors who respond that “there is nothing that can be done–you are just getting older”.
People who age poorly, are unable to control the amount of inflammation their bodies generate. Their immune cells are producing and releasing too many pro-inflammatory cytokines (1,2). These sorts of events can result in chronic inflammation, which is associated with heart and neuromuscular disease, diabetes, dementia, Alzheimer’s and autoimmune (3) conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and multiple sclerosis. Chronic inflammatory responses have also been associated with certain types of cancers.

One would expect that if you have a “boosted” immune response, that you would be better prepared to fight infections and cancerous cells. Instead, there is a significant decline in immune responses in people that are not aging in a healthy manner. Their immune cells are not as effective as healthier individuals in recognizing and eliminating pathogens or stopping the spread of cancer cells.

Immune homeostasis, also known as immune balance, is the key to optimum health and healthy aging. The immune system controls the amount of pro-inflammatory molecules it produces by generating the right types and amount of anti-inflammatory molecules (4) to keep excessive levels of inflammation in check.

1 Pro-inflammatory -immune molecules that “up-regulate”(increase) inflammatory responses
2 Cytokines: http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/glossary=cytokine
3 Autoimmune- http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Autoimmune/default.asp
4 Anti-inflammatory–immune molecules that inhibit (“down-regulate”) inflammation

Selected references (others by request):
http://www.infection-research.de/fileadmin/user_upload/Perspectives2009/April2009/INFECTION-RESEARCH_Perspectives–Infectious_Diseases_and_Aging_FINAL_20_04_2009.pdf
http://www.onderzoekinformatie.nl/en/oi/nod/onderzoek/OND1295431

Hi.  If you are time-challenged, and stressed out most of the time, but the fatigue makes it even harder to cope, there are some powerful steps you can take; the most important approach you can take however, is to control immune inflammation.

Inflammation is a yin-yang of influences.  For example, inflammation is the primary way that the body protects us from illnesses initiated by pathogens or cancer cells.  You might want to view a “pro-inflammatory” response as one in which the body is trying to “burn” the infection or cancer cells out (“up-regulate” inflammation).  [A more moderate pro-inflammatory response is also used by the body for healing when we are injured or ill.]

A person who is feeling great, both emotionally and physically, is more likely to be in optimal health. In such an individual, once an immune challenge has been met, a healthy immune system will start to down-regulate (turn-down) immune inflammation (“anti-inflammatory” response).

Both phases of an inflammatory immune response are vital for survival.  The body constantly strives for an exquisite balance of both pro-inflammatory and  anti-inflammatory responses.  This is termed immune homeostasis.

Reducing the amount of excessive inflammation that your body produces will go a long way towards helping the body return to immune homeostasis.

Comments and questions welcomed:  DrHellen@DrHellenGreenblatt.info

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